Pegasus Bridge

I have wanted to post about this for some time, and now I have the perfect opportunity. This is my entry for CFFC’s (CEE’s Fun Foto Challenge) Bridge Challenge.

Pegasus Bridge was originally named the Caen Canal Bridge until 1944 when it was renamed Pegasus Bridge in honor of the Ox and Buck Light Infantry captured this bridge on 6 June 1944. These troops landed mere meters from their objective in Horsa Gliders. They were the first paratroopers who landed in Normandy on D-Day and captured this bridge within 10 minutes intact. This raid was made famous in the movie The Longest Day. This bridge was decommissioned in 1994 and replaced with an exact replica. The orginal now sits in the grounds of the Pegasus Bridge Museum in Ranville-Benouville, Normandy.

The troops also captured the bridge across the River Orne, with the objective of keeping these bridges in Allied hands intact, while destroying the bridge over the River Dives to keep German troops from getting reinforcements to Sword Beach, where British troops landed on D-Day, and to destroy the gun battery at Merville. These missions were accomplished with heavy casualties. There are 2,000 soldiers buried in the Commonwealth War Graves cemetery, not far from the Pegasus Bridge Museum. For more information, you can visit the Pegasus Bridge Museum website.

Here is a replica Horse Glider.

Here is the Pegasus Bridge:

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