Frozen Friday

Woke up this morning to new snow at Zion. It’s been an absolutely gorgeous day. (I tried to post this yesterday, but the internet wasn’t cooperating.)

Enjoy!

Happy Thursday

Sunrise this morning in Zion National Park.

Merry Christmas from Zion NP

I would like to wish everyone a very Merry Christmas and a prosperous New Year!

I will do my best to post more frequently in the coming year. I have so many posts planned, but it seems that work and life get in the way too frequently.

Merry Christmas.

Enjoy, Kelly

Paris Revisited

I have a few more planned posts of Normandy that I’m skipping by request from a friend to “get to Paris!” These posts are to revisit Utah Beach and Omaha Beach; also, for Point du Hoc, Longues sur Mer, Saint Mer Eglise, La Fiere Bridge and Pegasus Bridge.  I will publish these in the near future, so keep an eye out for them.

After arriving in Paris (and a lengthy stay at the police station-see my post Paris, and a Lesson Learned for details), I was able to explore the city with my friends as planned.  I was able to see the Eiffel Tower at a distance, but never got close.  I also wanted to photograph the Tower at night, but apparently they turn the lights off at 1:00am, so I missed it.  Although as compensation, we drove around the Arc du Triumph about six times while raising a ruckus.

IMG_3544

Not far away, is Napoleon’s Mausoleum and Tomb, these are next door to the Military Museum.  I will have a post on the Military Museum at a later time as well.

IMG_3557Napoleon’s Mausoleum IMG_3562Napoleon’s Tomb

Looking toward at the Military Museum and Napoleon’s Mausoleum:IMG_3585

By the way, the police station is under the far right side under the park.  Going the other direction is the River Seine and its magnificient bridge.IMG_3579

The River Seine, with the Eiffel Tower in the background:IMG_3588

No visit to Paris would be complete without visiting the Louvre.  We had actually planned it for this day since it was open later than normal, but that was scrapped because of the visit to the police.  On the second to last day in France, we were able to make it to the Louvre but they closed at 6:00pm, and we didn’t arrive until about 8:00pm.  It’s still an amazing place.

IMG_3788IMG_3808The Louvre is extremely large, this is inside one of its courtyards.

After leaving the Louvre, it’s easy to get lost in traffic even with a GPS unit, and what do you see when you get lost in Paris?  Why Notre Dame of course.  I was hoping to visit this magnificient edifice but that was dashed when it caught fire earlier this year.

IMG_3811

Paris is an amazing city.  There are many interesting things to see.  If you do visit, secure all belongings and don’t carry too much cash, especially on the subways.

Enjoy,

Kelly

Mont Saint Michel Revisited

I know it’s been several months since I’ve been to France, and a few weeks since I last posted.  First, my apologies.  I have so many posts that I have wanted publish, but I haven’t been able to sit down and write them.  Here is such a post.

IMG_2398I’ve done some research on Mont Saint Michel Abby, and it was first constructed in 800 AD by the Romans as a military outpost.  Later, it became a hallowed shrine by some monks from Ireland.  Within a few centuries, it was rebuilt as a Catholic Abby.

During the 100 Year War, it was fortified to withstand the sieges that happened here.  During this period the outer defenses were constructed around the village.  During high tide, it’s completely shut off from the mainland.

In the early 1700’s it fell in decline and was pretty much abandoned by the monks, so Napoleon took it over and converted it into a state prison facility for political dissidents.  By 1847, it was falling into neglect and disrepair, so Victor Hugo spearheadded a movement to save the Abby from desolation and destruction.  By 1900, it was again occupied by monks as a monestary.

I have been wondering why it wasn’t destroyed during World War II, and in my research, I found that it was occupied by the Nazis for almost the entire war.  There was a garrison in place to monitor radio communications, but that was pretty much it.  They revered this Abby so much that they were adamant that nothing happen to it.  It became a relaxation resort for German officers and their families during the war.  At the end of the war, an American journalist and another American soldier drove up to the gates of the Abby to visit it, and the German soldiers there immediately surrendured and the Abby was liberated.

I read somewhere that the treasures from this Abby were taken to Saint-Lo for safe keeping in the church there.  Sadly the city was devestated by the Americans to force the Germans out and all treasures were destroyed.  The treasures of Mont Saint Michel were ancient texts and writings.  However I haven’t been able to verify the accuracy of these events regarding the treasures of Mont Saint Michel.

During our visit, we were able to go into the village a bit, and wander about the outer wall.IMG_2537

The inner gate that looks like it could close off and defend the village and Abby at any time.  Inside, there is a weighted wall and portcullis that looks operational, along with a drawbridge.

Other views of the Abby from along the wall.

IMG_2593IMG_2625IMG_2589

Our visit the the Abby was at 10:00pm, just before sunset at 11:00pm.  Looks like we might not make it back to the mainland with the tide coming in…

IMG_2600

 

It was an enjoyable adventure, and if you ever get the chance to visit this amazing place, DO IT!!

 

Enjoy,

Kelly

Bayeux Revisited

Bayeaux is a small city about 17km from the Normandy coast.  It is a beautiful place with narrow cobblestone streets.  The homes are reminiscent of old France.

IMG_3550

IMG_1965Bayeaux is a very old city, dating back to the 1st Century BC, known as Augustodurum when it was part of the Gallo-Roman Empire.  The city became part of the Roman Empire in the 5th Century.  It was later occupied by the Vikings from the 9th Century AD to about the 10th Century AD.  It was liberated by the Normans in the 12th Century, and was under the rule of William the Conqueror’s half brother Odo, Earl of Kent, who was instrumental in the construction of Notre Dame Cathedral de Bayeux and dedicated the Cathedral in 1077. IMG_1977

I can’t decide whether I like the black and white image of Notre Dame better, what do you think?

IMG_1977 bwBayeaux was then conquered by King Henry I of England after his father’s death in 1087 (Henry I was the son of William the Conqueror), and the city didn’t gain independence from England until 1450 by Charles VII of France.  It then prospered and grew to the present day.

During World War II, Bayeaux was the first city of the Battle of Normandy to be liberated.  On 16 June 1944, Charles de Gaulle made the first of two major speeches in which he made clear that France sided with the Allies.

IMG_1949The city was virtually untouched during the Battle of Normandy, since the German forces were fully involved defending Caen from the Allies.  The Bayeaux War Cemetery has the largest British cemetery dating to World War II in France.

On 5 June every year, at 1530 hrs (3:30pm for the rest of us), the Royal British Legion National attends a beating retreat ceremony at the cemetery.

On 6 June, at 1015 hrs (10:15am), there is a remembrance service in the Notre Dame Cathedral.  This year, French President Emmanuel Macron and British PM Theresa May were in attendance.  We happened to be there about an hour or two before their arrival, but we were unaware of this, so we left for Omaha Beach.

IMG_1955

I think that soldier in the far right corner is giving me a strange look, trying to decide what I’m up to, I guess.IMG_3553.JPGThis soldier was in the right place at the right time, since he looks to be joining his counterparts behind him in the window, smelling the wonderful food.

Enjoy,

Kelly

Happy Independence Day!

Recently I was privileged to visit Utah and Omaha beaches on D-Day. It was sobering to see what our soldiers were up against to liberate Europe from fascist control. Here lie thousands of our boys in solemn ground after giving their lives for freedom.

Remember, the only reason we’re celebrating our Independence Day is because our forefathers rose up against tyranny and oppression of the Crown, said enough is enough and defeated the greatest military on earth at the time with a ragtag group of farmers and craftsmen. Afterwards they created the greatest government that has ever existed on the planet, at the base of which is the belief that all men are created equal, and are endowed by our Creator with unalienable rights, among which are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, and governed by consent of the people, not a monarch born into power.

Remember freedom isn’t free and it is only one generation from extinction, so it must be fought for by the voting in those people who understand and believe in freedom and personal liberty, otherwise once a freedom is lost it can never be regained.

Wandering Around New York City

After visiting the World Trade Center, we walked all over Lower Manhattan in New York City.  A couple of blocks from St. Paul’s Church is Trinity Church.  This is the one featured in a recent Hollywood blockbuster film.  Interestingly enough, the original was built in 1697 then destroyed in the Great Fire in 1776, the second church was built in 1790 and later damaged by a heavy snow storm in 1838 and later demolished to build the one standing today and dedicated in 1846.  It is still an active parish with regular services and community outreach.

A brief history of Trinity Church.

Trinity Church is currently undergoing some structural reconditioning.

Trinity is the burial place of Alexander Hamilton, his wife and her family, and many other people from the time of the Revolutionary War.

IMG_1706.jpgIMG_1702.jpg

A few blocks south of Trinity Church is the Bull of Wall Street, although it seems that it’s on Hollywood Boulevard and not Wall Street.  It’s also nearly always heavily occupied by tourists that want their photo with different parts of the bull. Go figure, right?

IMG_1937.jpg

Just around the corner from the Bull is the old Custom House which is now the Native American Cultural Museum, part of the Smithsonian Institute.

IMG_1925.jpg

Across the street is Battery Park and the Statue of Liberty.  It was amazing and awesome to see Lady Liberty.  IMG_1899.jpg

Coming out of the subway in another part of the city, the first building I saw was this one, that looks like it has a helipad next to the penthouse suite.IMG_1810.jpg

Just down the street is the Empire State Building.

IMG_1811.jpg

IMG_1823.jpg

Another subway ride away is Times Square.

IMG_1842.jpg

IMG_1838.jpgThe saxaphone player on the left was jamming out some hot jazz, so we stopped there for a while to listen.  It’s crazy how many people are in Times Square.  It reminded me of the crowds in Zion Narrows.

Looking for a place to enjoy lunch, we found Bryant Park.  It has a nice pavilion for concerts, several cafes and a great view of the City Library.

Somewhere along the way near Central Park I found one of the oldest operating Jewish Synagogue in the country.  IMG_1773

I had a great time in New York, but this was just a stop over point to Paris and Normandy.

Enjoy,

Kelly

New York City Revisited: World Trade Center

I made it home from my trip to France without too many difficulties.  Luckily I still had my passport, prepaid airline tickets and hotel rooms.  If you’re wondering why, see my last post on Paris and a Lesson Learned.

Anyway, I’m going through my photos from this adventure, and I decided to post some about every part of this trip (this is what happens when there are over 3,000 photos to sort through).

On arriving in New York City, it was decided to store our luggage so we wouldn’t have to drag it around the city all day.  After negotiating the subway system (and seeing a string trio playing beautiful music at a station, another station had a rap performer), we made our way to the World Trade Center Memorial.

I know I briefly touched on this in a previous post, but I wanted to give this some more time because it is a significant place of honor in our country.  Standing at the memorial was humbling and moving experience and a privilege to witness what these people went through on that fateful day. It must have been a harrowing experience for them knowing they might not survive the day, and many did not. To the families of those who perished and to the survivors, you have my deepest respect and sympathy.

 

The second image shows a special tribute to some firefighters that gave up their lives to save others.  Thank you for your service, you will never be forgotten!

Not far away is the World Trade Center 1, aka, The Freedom Tower.

 

The other buildings surrounding the Freedom Tower are also part of the World Trade Center.  It’s quite a complex.

Nearby is St. Paul’s Chapel, where George Washington dedicated America on 30 April, 1789.   This church survived the attacks on 9/11/2001 when many buildings were damaged or destroyed by the falling towers nearby.

I found it interesting that the World Trade Center complex was built on land that once belonged to St. Paul’s parish.

On a plaque in the chapel above George Washington’s pew, it reads “Almighty God, we make our earnest prayer that you will keep the United States in Holy protection.” source

 

Standing here in the shadows of these buildings made me realize that it’s important to remember George Washington’s plea to keep our hearts and minds in tune with Almighty God and to serve those around us with love and peace.

Enjoy,

Kelly

D-Day Plus 75 Addendum

Yesterday afternoon, we were finally able to make it to Point du Hoc after all the ceremonies were done for the day. It was very interesting to see this place. I’ll post photos later. Just before we left, we ran into a guy that was filming at the memorial, and before we knew it, we were interviewed by @BlackRifleCoffee for a documentary of D-Day they are producing. It was really cool!

We had to go back to Omaha Beach again for more photos. When we got there, we happened upon the wreath laying ceremony at the memorial. It was a sobering and moving experience. I’ll post photos later.

As we were leaving our hotel this morning, our neighbors bid us farewell and telling us to moove along.

We then made our way to the Longues-sur-Mer Batterie. It’s the only German battery with the original guns still in place. I’ll do a post about this later.

There was also an army camp nearby.

We then went to Pegasus Bridge, which I’ll post some photos later.

After staying in Normandy for four days, it was time to leave. It’s absolutely gorgeous in Normandy. Small villages everywhere, winding country roads with hedge rows on both sides and trees lining the roads.

It was sad to see Normandy in the rear view mirror, however it was time to move on to Paris and the next leg of our journey. The traffic was absolutely crazy. Also, there’s a toll booth every 20-30 kilometers on the main freeway, which sucks. Anyway, we made it to our Paris hotel after fighting miles of rush hour traffic.