PFTA: Underground City?

This is an interesting photo.  I took it while traveling near Las Vegas, Nevada back in 2006.  I showed it to a friend, and she asked me where I found this underground city.  I was confused for a minute, and she repeated the question.  So I asked her to elaborate on where it could be, and she had no idea.

I’ll let you in on a little secret:  it’s not an underground city, but Hoover Dam at night.  This was before the new bridge was completed, they had just started working on it actually, so all traffic had to go across the dam.

I was traveling to the Grand Canyon after spending my days off in Las Vegas, it was late at night, and I saw the dam, and was blown away at how amazing it is at night.  It’s not often I’ve seen anyone photograph it at night, so I made several attempts before I came away with this gem.

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Enjoy,

Kelly

PFTA: Grand Canyon Bird’s Eye View

Today’s Photo From The Archive comes from the Grand Canyon.  I took this in 2005.  You may be wondering how on Earth I took a photo of the Grand Canyon, looking straight down at the Colorado River with the South Rim Village off in the distance.  Well, I wasn’t on Earth when I took this photo.  I was sitting in the back seat of a helicopter on one of the arial tours of the Canyon.  For someone who has a hard time with heights, it was actually a pleasant journey, and something I’ll never forget.

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Enjoy,

Kelly

Gallery Updates

On the advice from a fellow blogger, I organized my galleries to be subject specific.  There is a new gallery for Bryce Canyon National Park (I realize I need to post more photos of this beautiful place), Grand Canyon National Park, and of course, my beloved Zion National Park.  I also posted galleries for flowers and birds, with a gallery for Ancient Art, Arizona, and Other Animals in the works.

Enjoy the images! Remember, they are all available for purchase.  Contact me for details.

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Paria Ghost Town

Last week I went to the Paria ghost town with a couple of friends (you know who you are). We found a building still standing for the most part, at least has four walls and part of a roof.

Paria was settled between 1848 and 1867, when it was flooded out and abandoned. The town was on the shores of the Paria River, but no longer exists because the river widened and washed everything into the Colorado River.

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High on the hillside are the remains a couple of buildings, one pictured below only has a couple of partial walls remaining.

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Here is the full house.

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Water, and Man’s Quest to Conquer It

Water. It’s a simple word, but it means a lot to people, especially here in the Desert Southwest. There are only a few sources of fresh water here, like the Colorado River and its tributaries.

Of course, without water we wouldn’t have the Grand Canyon.

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Having the Colorado River running through your back yard is an awesome sight to behold, but fraught with danger. Every time there is a major storm along the river or its tributaries, there is a flash flood which is both deadly and damaging to the surrounding areas.

Man has always longed to tame this river and to control its power. In order to do that, he would make an undertaking that was monumental, even by today’s standards. It would take many years and thousands of workers to accomplish. In fact, it took so many people to build, they would need a city to accommodate everyone. A new city was born not far from the dam that is still a major tourist destination today, because of the new lake that formed because of this dam, Boulder City, Nevada.

Workers weren’t a problem, because during the Great Depression people were clamoring for work anywhere they could get it. Several years and millions of tons of concrete later (which was poured so fast, it’s still curing even after 70 years), man had finally conquered the Mighty Colorado.

The result of all this blood, sweat and tears, and sadly, many lives, is the historic Hoover Dam. It was dedicated on September 30, 1935, nearly two years ahead of schedule. It’s the only government project of any time to be completed ahead of schedule and under budget.

Thousands of people flock to this landmark every day. However, when night comes, the people disappear, the lights come on and the entire atmosphere changes.

Here is my favorite view of Hoover Dam:

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Wild Weekly’s Photo Contest: Mountains

“I want to see mountains again, Gandalf! Mountains!” – Bilbo Baggins
I’m participating in the online adventure travel and outdoor photography magazine Wild Weekly Photo Challenge for bloggersThis week’s Challenge is: Mountains!

I love the mountains! There’s just something special about mountains, either looking up at them, or down from them. They are majestic, timeless and breathtaking. Sometimes it helps to get away from it all in the mountains just to contemplate existence and life in general.

Here is a tribute to John Muir and his favorite place: Yosemite Valley, specifically Half Dome and Yosemite Falls.

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Of course, a bit closer to home (but not quite) is the famous Horseshoe Bend. This is looking off the mountain at the Colorado River, just south of Glen Canyon Dam.

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Here is a very famous vista of Zion National Park, the Watchman Mountain.

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The only way to really appreciate the size and majesty of mountains is to get up close and personal. Here is a view of a mountain from the West Rim Trail in Zion. The ponderosa pine tree is about 60-80 feet tall. The cliff face is about 2000-3000 feet straight up. This gives a nice scale to Zion.

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Here are a couple of mountains from the West Rim Trail:

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This is the view from Deer Trap Mountain, one of the less popular trails in Zion. This is looking at Lady Mountain and into Heaps Canyon where the Emerald Pools are located.

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Here are the Eagle Crags, just outside of Zion, one of my favorite cliffs.

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